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In today's fast moving world, keeping informed on the public policies that impact your personal or work life is a daunting task. Fortunately, technology can aid in that effort and that is the ultimate purpose of Key Policy Data.

 

We accomplish this goal with the help of the innovative Qlikview data visualization and discovery program. Qlikview allows us to post huge amounts of data without sacrificing usability.  For instance, our state and county tax burden app can quickly show you how your state's tax burden ranks and how it has changed over time with just a few clicks of a button.

 

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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s state and local government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. In this analysis, each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. Based on this state and local government workforce productivity index, California has the fourth least productive state and local government workforce in the country.

 

Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, by county, level of government, and over time.

 

 

In 2016, #California had the 4th least productive state and local #government workforce in the country http://bit.ly/2BDEhpN @keypolicydata #CApolitics #CAleg #CAsen #CAgov (click to tweet)

 

As shown in Chart 1, for state and local government employment in 2016, California employed 15.6 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector (employment ratio) which is right at the national average of 15.7 and is 29th highest ratio in the country.

 

 Chart 1 California State and Local Government Employees per 100 Private Sector Employees Rank 2016.jpg

 

In 2016, #California state & local #government employed 15.6 for every 100 employed in private sector—the 29th highest ratio in the country and right at the US average http://bit.ly/2BDEhpN @keypolicydata #CApolitics #CAleg #CAsen #CAgov (click to tweet)

 

Additionally, California’s employment ratio has been decreasing. As shown in Chart 2, between 1969 and 2016, the employment ratio shrank by -6 percent to 15.6 in 2016 from 16.7 in 1969. This decrease is the opposite of the national average which increased by 2 percent to 15.7 in 2016 from 15.4 in 1969.

 

 Chart 2 California State and Local Employment Ratio vs. U.S. Average 1969 to 2016.JPG

 

As shown in Chart 3, for state and local government compensation in 2016, California government employees earning 32 percent more than those in the private sector (compensation ratio) which is 133 percent higher than the national average of 14 percent and is the 4th highest compensation ratio in the country.

 

 Chart 3 California State and Local Government Compensation as a Percent of the Private Sector Rank 2016.jpg

 

In 2016, #California state & local #government compensation was 32% higher than in the private sector—the 4th highest ratio in the country and 133 percent above US average http://bit.ly/2BDEhpN @keypolicydata #CApolitics #CAleg #CAsen #CAgov (click to tweet)

 

Additionally, California’s compensation ratio has been increasing. As shown in Chart 4, between 1969 and 2016, the compensation ratio increased by 16 percentage points to 32 percent in 2016 from 16 percent in 1969. This is a slightly faster growth rate than the national average which increased by 15 percentage points to 14 percent in 2016 from -1 percent in 1969.

 

 Chart 4 California State and Local Compensation Ratio vs. U.S. Average 1969 to 2016.JPG

 

As shown in Chart 5, it is state and local wages and salaries and benefits that are responsible for California’s high government compensation ratio. For state and local wages and salaries in 2016, California employees earn as much as those in the private sector which is the 13th highest wages and salaries ratio in the country and higher than the national average of -8 percent.

 

 Chart 5 California Components of State and Local Compensation Ratio 1969 to 2016.JPG

 

For state and local benefits in 2016, California employees earn 210 percent more than those in the private sector which is 65 percent higher than the national average of 127 percent and is the 3rd highest benefit ratio in the country.

 

 

Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, by county, level of government, and over time.

 

Of course, efficiency for local government helps to be measured on a more local scale. As such, we have also calculated the employment and compensations ratios of local government workers for every county in California.

 

The California counties with the highest local government employment ratios include:

  • Sierra County, CA (130.7)
  • Modoc County, CA (61.9)
  • Lassen County, CA (52.2)
  • Inyo County, CA (49.2)
  • Del Norte County, CA (47.5)
  • Plumas County, CA (47.0)
  • Trinity County, CA (44.5)
  • Colusa County, CA (39.3)
  • Yuba County, CA (37.0)
  • Amador County, CA (35.7)

 

The California counties with the lowest local government employment ratios include:

  • San Diego County, CA (11.9)
  • Placer County, CA (11.7)
  • San Luis Obispo County, CA (11.6)
  • Los Angeles County, CA (11.1)
  • Alameda County, CA (10.8)
  • Napa County, CA (10.2)
  • Orange County, CA (7.6)
  • San Mateo County, CA (7.4)
  • San Francisco County, CA (7.4)
  • Santa Clara County, CA (7.3)

 

The California counties with the highest local government compensation ratios include:

  • Imperial County, CA (122 percent)
  • Mono County, CA (109 percent)
  • Calaveras County, CA (105 percent)
  • Monterey County, CA (86 percent)
  • Mariposa County, CA (85 percent)
  • Tulare County, CA (84 percent)
  • Riverside County, CA (79 percent)
  • San Benito County, CA (78 percent)
  • Trinity County, CA (75 percent)
  • Sierra County, CA (72 percent)

 

The California counties with the lowest local government compensation ratios include:

  • Yuba, CA (38 percent)
  • Orange, CA (38 percent)
  • Sonoma, CA (37 percent)
  • Alameda, CA (35 percent)
  • Santa Barbara, CA (33 percent)
  • San Diego, CA (31 percent)
  • Contra Costa, CA (25 percent)
  • San Francisco, CA (8 percent)
  • San Mateo, CA (-12 percent)
  • Santa Clara, CA  (-19 percent)

 

Overall, it is California’s high compensation ratio, driven by both wages and salaries benefits, that is the primary reason for California having the 4th worst state and local government workforce productivity index.

 

Read more about the "government workforce productivity Index" methodology here.

 

Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, by county, level of government, and over time.

 

 

Finally, don’t forget to watch our exclusive time-lapse video of our state and local government workforce productivity index over the last 47 years! See if your state has been above or below the national average?

 

 


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